BARUCH DAYAN EMET

Questa mattina è mancata una persona a cui ho voluto bene.

Ha lottato come un leone contro la malattia che l aveva colpita.

Di lei ricordo i suoi bellissimi occhi azzurri e il sorriso. Amava la vita come poche persone io abbia conosciuto e con grande risolutezza affrontava i problemi, grandi o piccoli che fossero.

L’abbiamo tutti ammirata per questa  sua voglia di guardare sempre avanti con la gioia di vivere.

che la terra le sia lieve

BARUCH DAYAN EMET

Riporto per chi non conoscesse il significato di queste parole, la spiegazione letterale e morale che hanno nell’ebraismo,perchè è veramente appagante.

 

“Baruch Dayan Emet” – Why Do We Bless God When Someone Dies?

The traditional Jewish response to news of a death, any death, is “Baruch Dayan emet,” “Blessed is the true Judge.”

Here are some reasons for this ritual:

1. If there is a ritual formula to say when I get shocking news, I am less likely to say something inappropriate. Death is solemn, and even when it is expected, it can be a shock. People say stupid things when they are shocked. Having a script for the first few moments can be very helpful.

2. The statement acknowledges that I do not know the sum of that person’s life. I am not qualified to stand in judgment upon them. By saying that only God is so qualified, I either affirm faith that God is the only true judge, or (if I am not a believer in a personal God) I acknowledge that only God, if there were such a person, can sit in judgment.

3. Making a statement of humility (“I cannot judge”) reminds me not to say something stupid with my next words.

4. If the death is tragic or inexplicable, it is a way of saying, “I do not understand how this could have happened” without starting a conversation about the possibilities. It keeps us away from platitudes that might get in the way of healthy grief, or other statements that might be unhelpful to the mourners.

5. The longer form of the blessing appears first in the Mishnah Berachot 9:2 (“Blessed are You, Eternal our God, ruler of the Universe, who is the True Judge.” We are told in that Mishnah that this is a blessing to say at the reception of any bad news. Rabbi Louis Rieser teaches that this is a way of acknowledging the Presence of God at a moment of high emotion, when we are most overwhelmed by loss.

6. The moment of death is a time when no words suffice, but we human beings are relentless with our words. By providing a simple ritual of humility with many possible interpretations, Jewish tradition gives us a container for our words at a time when they can do terrible harm. There is no need to say anything more, after “Baruch Dayan emet” – ultimately it says, I have no words for this. We stand with the mourner or stand as a mourner in the presence of the greatest mystery of life, and with these words clear the way for the long process of grief.

 

 

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